5/3/1 for powerlifting steroids

This program does an absolutely masterful job of fatigue management. And let’s be honest, it HAS to! If you’re going to use a program like this, layered in with the training of athletes who are doing sprints, jumps, and throws, you need to be damn sure that recovery is on point. With the way that volume and intensity are manipulated from week to week, and phase to phase, that is absolutely going to be the case on this program. The use of “mini” blocks is a very cool aspect of the programmatic structure.
 
Very few people are going to fail to recover on a program that features once weekly frequency on the big three lifts and a deload every fourth week.
 
However, as I alluded to in the review of The Cube Method , like most American programs, this one features once weekly frequency which simply isn’t optimal. Now, to be absolutely fair, Chad Wesley Smith does offer a high frequency variation in the book where you’re training six days per week. On that template, you hit the upperbody three times per week, squat twice a week, and deadlift once. If you decide to go with that option then this criticism is completely invalid.
 
That said, if you’re on the base, original program, as we’ve discussed elsewhere, it just isn’t necessary nor is it optimal to hold the weekly frequency of the competitive lifts down to a single session per week. Look, as powerlifters, doing the lifts is our version of practice. How do you get good at any sport? You practice. Would you expect to be a dominant basketball player if you only practiced dribbling once per week, shooting once per week, and passing once per week? Of course this isn’t a perfect analogy, but the point remains. In my opinion, your technique is always going to leave something to be desired if you’re hitting the lifts with a once per week frequency. For powerlifting, I personally prefer to see more frequency than is used here.
 
However, I do want to say that the overall volume is much more appropriate than programs like The Cube or the original 5/3/1 . Instead of doing a single top set, or maybe two or three work sets, this program features no less than five work sets on any of the accumulation weeks. You’re definitely going to get enough work to progress on this program. I’d just question whether or not the results will be as good as if you had distributed that volume more equally throughout the week.

Dan John’s beginner program is about as simple at they come, reflecting John’s reductive approach to training. Dan describes his methodology as essentially ‘Bulgarian’ meaning that the lifter focuses on the competition lifts and squatting to max. First the back squat is mastered at which point the clean is introduced, followed by the snatch. Once the lifts are learned, the athlete performs the snatch, clean & jerk, military press and front squat every day three days a week. It’s as straightforward as that.

After this 3 week cycle is complete, the athlete should take a deload week. From there they will continue on a similar rotation of ME exercises, just dropping the work sets to either 3 or 4 reps. As this is a percentage based scheme, it is necessary to adjust your working 1 rep max. To do this you can either add a set amount, ie. 10 pounds to your 1rm that you base your percentages off of, or if you performed a bonus set at any point throughout the cycle you can readjust based off of that. A bonus set should be performed, if you feel very confident after your prescribed work sets are done smoothly and with sound technique; a bonus set will not necessarily be done each session. To do that you will need to use the following equation, .0333 x (Weight x Reps Performed) + Weight = Projected 1rm. When you begin a new 3 week cycle, you will continue with the progression on the Olympic lifts as shown in the earlier training cycle, picking things up at 9×3 at 75%. Also, when beginning a new cycle you should flip your dynamic effort exercises to push jerks during session 1 and DE Deadlifts in session 2. The rep schemes utilized during the dynamic effort lifts are higher than what is normally prescribed in Westside related literature, for two reasons. 1) The Crossfit athlete isn’t as highly qualified as the competitive powerlifter, so more repetitions will allow for greater motor learning and 2) Crossfit competitions often require athlete’s to perform high volumes of work as quickly as possible, and these rep schemes will teach the athlete do that, without losing the intent of the movement, SPEED.

Ah, the Bulgarian Method. On the one hand, I think something akin to the Bulgarian Method eventually becomes necessary and, in fact, is the best way to train. On the other hand, I think it might be one of the single most inappropriate ways for novices and early intermediates to train. And who is most likely to pursue an exotic, sexy program like the Bulgarian Method? Why, novices and intermediates of course. In this review, find out why I don’t recommend that you hop on super high frequency programs early in your lifting career.
 

5/3/1 for powerlifting steroids

5/3/1 for powerlifting steroids

Ah, the Bulgarian Method. On the one hand, I think something akin to the Bulgarian Method eventually becomes necessary and, in fact, is the best way to train. On the other hand, I think it might be one of the single most inappropriate ways for novices and early intermediates to train. And who is most likely to pursue an exotic, sexy program like the Bulgarian Method? Why, novices and intermediates of course. In this review, find out why I don’t recommend that you hop on super high frequency programs early in your lifting career.
 

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