Hysteroid wikipedia

The older MAOIs' heyday was mostly between the years 1957 and 1970. [22] The initial popularity of the 'classic' non-selective irreversible MAO inhibitors began to wane due to their serious interactions with sympathomimetic drugs and tyramine -containing foods that could lead to dangerous hypertensive emergencies. As a result, the use by medical practitioners of these older MAOIs declined. When scientists discovered that there are two different MAO enzymes (MAO-A and MAO-B), they developed selective compounds for MAO-B, (for example, selegiline , which is used for Parkinson's disease), to reduce the side-effects and serious interactions. Further improvement occurred with the development of compounds ( moclobemide and toloxatone ) that not only are selective but cause reversible MAO-A inhibition and a reduction in dietary and drug interactions. [45] [46] Moclobemide , was the first reversible inhibitor of MAO-A to enter widespread clinical practice. [47]

With so many possible symptoms, hysteria was often [ when? ] considered a catchall diagnosis where any unidentifiable ailment could be assigned. [ citation needed ] As diagnostic techniques improved, the number of ambiguous cases that might have been attributed to hysteria declined. For instance, before the introduction of electroencephalography , epilepsy was frequently confused with hysteria. [12] Many cases that had previously been labeled hysteria were reclassified by Sigmund Freud as anxiety neuroses . [12]

Diana’s phenomenon, Hilary Mantel wrote , is “self-renewing as the seasons, always desired and never possessed.” The princess myth, Mantel authoritatively argues, lives beyond Diana simply because we grant it life, renewing it every year in remembrance and mourning. And surely, the myth of Diana undone, the princess turned hysteric still haunts, too. The medical narratives spun at the Salpêtrière—the hysterical women that lived behind the hospital’s walls, preserved in photographs—still tap us on the shoulder, urging us to treat Charcot’s discovery and innovation as natural, eternal truths. But perhaps, as with the princess myth, we want to preserve hysteria, the myth of uniquely feminine vulnerability. Perhaps we want to be haunted. Perhaps hysteria is too bound up to romantic myths of princesses and feminity—myths that we are unable to part with—to be exorcised.

In 1988 Parks Canada historian Lyle Dick began a substantial challenge to the concept that piblokto exists at all. Dick examined the original records of the European Arctic explorers , and ethnographic and linguistic reports on Inughuit societies, and discovered that not only is the majority of academic speculation into piblokto based on reports of only eight cases, but the word "piblokto" / "pibloktoq" does not exist within Inuktun (the Inughuit language); possibly, Dick concluded, this may have been the result of errors in phonetic transcription . In a 1995 paper published in the journal Arctic Anthropology , [13] and in his 2001 book Muskox land: Ellesmere Island in the Age of Contact , Dick suggests that piblokto is a "phantom phenomenon", arising more from the Inuhuit reaction to European explorers in their midst . [9]

Hysteroid wikipedia

hysteroid wikipedia

In 1988 Parks Canada historian Lyle Dick began a substantial challenge to the concept that piblokto exists at all. Dick examined the original records of the European Arctic explorers , and ethnographic and linguistic reports on Inughuit societies, and discovered that not only is the majority of academic speculation into piblokto based on reports of only eight cases, but the word "piblokto" / "pibloktoq" does not exist within Inuktun (the Inughuit language); possibly, Dick concluded, this may have been the result of errors in phonetic transcription . In a 1995 paper published in the journal Arctic Anthropology , [13] and in his 2001 book Muskox land: Ellesmere Island in the Age of Contact , Dick suggests that piblokto is a "phantom phenomenon", arising more from the Inuhuit reaction to European explorers in their midst . [9]

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